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  • How to Get a Good Night’s Rest in a Hotel

    Posted on April 12, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    hotelsleepQuality hotels make every effort to ensure you’re as comfortable as possible. But even an attentive staff, full amenities, and a comfortable bed can’t guarantee you a good night’s sleep in a hotel. Because you’re sleeping in a new environment, away from your own bed, you might find it difficult to fall and stay asleep.

    There are a few things you can do to combat this “hotel effect.” Follow these tips to get a good night’s rest the next time you’re staying in a hotel.

    1. Request a Quiet Room

    If you already know you’re a light sleeper, you should request a room with a location that avoids disturbances. Requesting a room on the highest floor and furthest from the elevators will help you avoid the noise of guests and staff as you sleep.

    1. Get the Right Pillows

    It can be difficult to sleep on hotel pillows. Even luxury hotel rooms may have pillows that don’t offer the right level of support or aren’t made of your preferred material.

    You should test out your pillows when you arrive in your hotel room. If you don’t like the current pillows, call the front desk and see if they have other options. Alternatively, you can take a travel pillow along on your trip so you know you’re covered wherever you go.

    1. Block Out Noise

    Are the city’s ambient noises disturbing your sleep, or is the silence of the country keeping you up? Either way, environmental noises (or the lack thereof) can throw off your sleep. In this case, soft music or white noise from a fan or sound machine could help you get some shuteye. You may even prefer earplugs.

    If you haven’t packed supplies, the hotel might stock fans, sound machines, or earplugs for guests. If the noise is really disturbing - for example, nearby construction sounds - you may need to request a different room.

    1. Adjust the Temperature

    You should adjust the hotel room’s thermostat to a comfortable sleeping temperature as soon as you arrive. That way, you can verify that the air conditioning is working properly and ensure that there will be plenty of time for the temperature to adjust before you go to sleep.

    1. Block Out Light

    Many hotel rooms already have blackout curtains or dark blinds, but even a sliver of light can feel invasive when you’re in a new environment. You can get creative and seal out light by lining towels along the front door and using clothespins to pinch curtains or blinds together.

    Alternatively, you use a sleep mask to block out all light.

    1. Do Not Disturb

    The “Do Not Disturb” signs are put in your room for a reason. Make use of them! Hang the sign on your door at least an hour before bedtime, and don’t take it off until you’re fully awake in the morning.

    If you anticipate getting calls in your room, you may also want to tell the front desk you don’t wish to be disturbed until morning. 

    1. Follow Your Normal Routine

    If you follow a specific routine at home to relax before bed – such as reading a book or taking a bath – you should try to maintain that routine during your hotel stay. It can help you maintain your normal sleeping patterns.

    1. Eat Right and Exercise 

    Traveling doesn’t give you an excuse to skip healthy habits. Consistent exercise and a balanced diet promote healthy, restful sleep. Try to hit the hotel gym before work, or do some of your sightseeing on foot. And while you shouldn’t necessarily begrudge yourself some decadent room service, don’t overdo it.  Make sure to balance your meals.


    This post was posted in Education

  • 6 Ways You Can Use Hot and Cold Therapy Packs for Relief

    Posted on April 4, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    hotcoldHot and cold therapy packs are versatile products that can be heated or cooled to provide quick relief for a variety of aches, pains, and injuries. In most cases, you simply apply the pack to the area that’s causing you discomfort. And while they may not have instant healing power, hot and cold packs can help you recover and manage pain.

    Here are six issues that you can relieve with hot and cold therapy packs.

    1. Joint and Knee Pain

    Recurring joint or knee pain and stiffness, such as that caused by arthritis, can be soothed using a heated pack. That’s because heat enhances circulation and delivers nutrients to your joints. This helps your joints lubricate, encourages the healing of tissue, decreases stiffness, and even distracts you from your pain.

    This kind of heat therapy is often recommended to warm up stiff joints before physical activity.

    1. Sprains and Overuse Injuries

    Cold therapy is better suited for acute or severe pain that causes inflammation or swelling, such as a sprain or overuse injury caused by accident or exercise. Applying cold packs to your injury restricts your blood vessels, slowing down circulation and reducing swelling. Cold temperatures also numb your nerve endings, which dulls pain.

    If you frequently work out, cold packs can relieve sore muscles that have been overworked.

    1. Everyday Muscle Soreness and Aches

    Heat therapy can provide welcome relief for everyday muscle soreness and common aches and pains. Heat therapy soothes and relaxes your muscles, reduces spasms, and can provide you a greater range of motion. If your pain isn’t injury-based but is an everyday soreness, heat therapy is the way to go.

    1. Migraines

    Although it may not work for everyone and the reasons why are poorly understood at best, cold packs can help provide relief from migraines. Anecdotally, many migraine sufferers have reported significant pain reduction when using cold therapy.

    1. Dry Eyes

    Heat therapy can even provide relief to dry and tired eyes caused by allergies, aging, or staring at screens. A moist heat pack can help reduce evaporative tear loss, keeping your eyes lubricated. You can heat up the MicroBeads Dry Eye Compress Moist Heat Pack and deliver relief to your dry, tired eyes.

    1. Stress and Tension

    The type of discomfort caused by stress - such as muscle tension in your neck and back - can build up over time and become quite uncomfortable. By invigorating blood flow, heat therapy can help reduce that tension and provide muscle relief.

    In Closing

    Core Products hot and cold packs can be cooled in the freezer or warmed in the microwave and applied directly to the affected body area. When choosing to heat or cool your packs, a good rule of thumb is to use cold therapy for recent injuries with swelling and heat therapy for chronic or everyday aches and pains. 

    Sources:
    https://www.arthritis-health.com/treatment/alternative-treatments/when-and-why-apply-heat-arthritic-joint
    https://www.excedrin.com/migraines/treatment/ice-pack-for-migraines/


    This post was posted in Education

  • For American Diabetes Association Alert Day, Learn Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors

    Posted on March 26, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    diabetesAmerican Diabetes Association Alert Day, intended to raise awareness of the risk factors for diabetes and encourage Americans to assess their own risks, is March 27th. Diabetes is a health condition that affects the body’s ability to regulate its blood sugar, and although it affects over 29 million Americans, more than 25% of them may not know they have it.

    The primary goal of the day is to encourage people to take the type 2 diabetes risk test, which only takes a minute to complete but can help you assess your own diabetes risk.

    So what factors do affect your risk of diabetes? Here are eight:

    1. Genetics

    The greater the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in your immediate family, the greater risk you have of developing it yourself. Although there is no distinct inheritance pattern (meaning diabetes isn’t necessarily passed down from generation to generation), research does show that certain genetic markers make you more susceptible to diabetes. If you have a family member (or members) with diabetes, you are more likely to develop it yourself.

    Even if you don’t know of any family members with diabetes, they could simply be undiagnosed.

    1. Weight

    Your weight is the single biggest predictor of developing type 2 diabetes, and 90% of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. When you are overweight, you put greater pressure on your body’s ability to produce and use insulin to control blood sugar levels, leading to a greater risk of diabetes. The rise of type 2 diabetes in the United States also correlates with the national rise in obesity.

    1. Age

    The older you get, the greater the odds you have of developing diabetes. Your risk for diabetes begins to rise at age 45 and increases dramatically at age 65. Being young, however, doesn’t eliminate the risk – children and adolescents can develop type 2 diabetes, and those that do are at a higher risk of other complications such as heart and kidney disease.

    1. High Blood Pressure

    High blood pressure, or hypertension, is both prevalent with diabetics and has been linked to a predisposition for diabetes.

    1. Lack of Exercise and Sedentary Lifestyles

    A lack of exercise and a sedentary lifestyle are big contributors to diabetes. If you rarely exercise and spend much of your time sitting, you’re already at greater risk for diabetes, but you also may be contributing to other risk factors such as obesity or high blood pressure.

    While regular exercise helps reduce your risk of diabetes, it doesn’t mean you’re in the clear. Sitting for long periods of time - whether or not you get consistent exercise - can also increase your risk. If you have an office job, you should make an effort to break up all that time you spend sitting at your desk.

    1. Gender

    Men are more likely to have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, although this risk could be due to men seeing the doctor less regularly than women.

    1. Race

    Different races and ethnic groups are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than others. African Americans, American Indians, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans are among the groups that have a higher risk.

    1. Gestational Diabetes

    If you had gestational diabetes when you were pregnant, you also have a higher chance of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

    Assessing Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    Certain risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as age, gender, and race, are beyond your control. But other factors, such as level of activity, weight, and blood pressure, can be improved. For American Association Diabetes Alert Day, make sure to take the test to determine your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and then take action to reduce that risk level!

    Sources:
    https://www.coreproducts.com/blog/2017/09/15/stuck-at-a-desk-all-day-here-are-6-ways-to-maintain-your-health/
    http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test/?loc=alertday
    https://www.everydayhealth.com/type-2-diabetes/living-with/sedentary-lifestyle-increases-type-2-diabetes-risk/
    https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/type-2-diabetes#inheritance
    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318472.php


    This post was posted in Education

  • How to Know When You Can’t Just “Walk Off” an Injury

    Posted on March 20, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    walkoffSome injuries are merely temporary aches and pains caused by minor accidents, exercise, or even everyday activities. But other injuries are more problematic, and may require rest, therapy, or other medical interventions.

    It isn’t always easy to tell which is which, and in the case of serious injury, “walking it off” can make the problem worse. Sometimes, there are warning signs that you’ve suffered a serious injury, and you need to get yourself to a doctor.

    Here are five signs you can’t just walk off an injury.

    1. You Know Exactly When the Injury Occurred

    Everyday aches and pains and overuse injuries will often occur subtly, and you won’t be able to pinpoint the cause of pain. You may have slept on your neck wrong, or walked a greater distance than normal. In these cases, you might be able to wait and see if the injury heals itself.

    Other times, you know exactly how you hurt yourself. If you roll your ankle or felt a muscle tear, for instance, you were probably able to immediately identify your injury. In these cases, you’re more likely to have severely injured yourself.

    1. It’s Hard to Walk

    You can’t walk it off when you can’t walk. If taking a few steps causes major pain, you may have fractured something. Even if you didn’t, you will probably need time to rest your injury so you don’t make it worse. If you can’t walk, it’s time to get yourself to the doctor (and put your feet up in the meantime).

    1. You Feel Unstable

    Injuries don’t always come with severe pain. But if you feel unstable or wobbly as you move, you could have sustained a severe injury. For example, a wobbly or unstable knee could be the sign of a ligament tear. If you’re having trouble supporting yourself, you should see your doctor.

    1. Pain That Doesn’t Dissipate

    Normal aches and pains aren’t always a cause for concern. Stretching, rest, and strengthening exercises can often help you overcome minor injuries. But pain that progressively worsens over time could be a sign of a greater problem.

    1. Head Injuries

    Head injuries need to be taken seriously. If you have any symptoms  - such as blurred vision, dizziness, or nausea - after taking a knock on the head, you may have suffered a concussion. Get yourself to a doctor.

    In Closing

    If you experience any of these warning signs, you may have sustained a serious injury. Even if not, it’s usually better to be safe than sorry, because serious injuries don’t always make themselves known. If you suspect you’ve been injured, you should see your doctor to address the issue before it becomes worse.


    This post was posted in Education

  • 7 Ways to Improve Your Sleep for Sleep Awareness Week

    Posted on March 12, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    sleepThe National Sleep Foundation’s annual Sleep Awareness Week is March 11th  - March 17th this year. The organization is devoted to educating the public and promoting the benefits of a good night’s rest.

    Sleep is an important component of your overall health, affecting your physical and psychological wellbeing and dictating the quality of your waking life. If you aren’t getting good sleep on a regular basis, Sleep Awareness Week is the perfect time to take action.

    Here are seven ways to improve your sleeping for Sleep Awareness Week.

    1. Start Following a Sleep Schedule

    Your circadian rhythm (also known as your internal clock) regulates your sleeping and waking cycles. If you go to sleep and wake up at random or inconsistent times, you’re disrupting that rhythm and your body will have trouble recognizing when it’s time to sleep and wake up. If you go to bed and wake up at the same time every day (even on weekends) you’ll help your body maintain its internal rhythm and you’ll get better rest.

    1. Get a Better Pillow

    The quality of your sleep can depend on your pillow. A pillow with the wrong level of support will lead to neck pain or stiffness. Some pillows tend to retain heat, making you sweat. Others are simply uncomfortable, causing you to toss and turn. If your pillow isn’t getting the job done, it’s time to get a better one.

    1. Ditch the Electronics

    The light emitted by electronics, such as televisions, cell phones, and tablets, inhibits the production of melatonin, a hormone that helps you fall asleep. Using gadgets right before bed can actually sabotage your ability to get a good night’s rest. Lay off the electronics at least an hour before bed.

    1. Block the Light

    If you don’t hang curtains, or if the curtains you do have let in too much light, you might be reducing your ability to get a good night’s sleep. Outside light can cause you to wake up or prevent you from getting a truly deep sleep. Investing in some blackout curtains could do you a world of good.

    1. Get Some Exercise

    A consistent exercise routine reduces stress and tires you out, making it easier to doze off and improving the quality and duration of your sleep. Getting into exercise will convey many other health benefits as well. Just avoid exercising immediately before bed, as the stimulation and increased heart rate will actually make it harder to fall asleep.

    1. Relax

    This may seem obvious, but your body needs time to unwind before bed. If you’re running errands or working right up to the moment you go to bed, your mind may still be too active and stimulated to allow you to get quality sleep. Give yourself some time to relax.

    1. Reduce Noise

    Busy streets and loud neighbors can contribute a lot of sleep-disturbing environmental noise. On the flipside, some people have trouble falling asleep when it’s dead silent. You can reduce noise with earplugs or create a better noise environment with a sound machine. These solutions are affordable and easy to use. 

    Sources:
    https://sleep.org/
    https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/what-circadian-rhythm


    This post was posted in Education

  • Seven Ways to Deal with a Sprained Ankle

    Posted on March 6, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    ankleSprained ankles sound like minor injuries until you suffer one, and your routine is majorly disrupted. Just walking around can be extremely difficult and painful with a sprain. The problem is compounded if you’re usually very active or if your job requires you to be on your feet.

    While there’s no quick fix for a sprained ankle, there are things you can do to aid recovery and get back on your feet. Here are seven ways to deal with a sprained ankle.

    1. Cold Therapy

    Applying cold to your ankle for the first two to three days after your sprain can make a big difference. You should ice your ankle every few hours for 10 to 20 minutes. The cold can help reduce swelling and provide pain relief. You can use hot and cold packs, but a Ziploc bag or bucket full of ice will do in a pinch.

    1. Elevation

    Anytime you sit or lie down, you should elevate your ankle above the level of your heart. This can reduce bruising and keep down swelling. You should try to keep your ankle elevated for two to three hours per day.

    1. Compression

    Applying compression to your ankle will also help reduce swelling and bruising. Wrapping the effected ankle in an elastic bandage will do the trick. Try not to wrap the bandage too tight - if it feels numb or the pain worsens, loosen the bandage a bit.

    1. OTC Medication

    Over the counter pain relief medications, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, can help manage the pain of a sprained ankle. NSAIDS such as Aleve will also fight pain, but reduce swelling as well. Check your medicine cabinet if you need a little relief.

    1. Ankle Supports

    When you still have to get around, an ankle support or brace can help. These supports wrap around your ankle to give you better stability, and they apply compression to reduce swelling. They’re easily adjustable and one size should fit most ankles.

    1. Exercises

    While you want to take it easy most of the time, you should perform some regular, light exercises. You can do range-of-motion exercises to improve your ankle mobility, stretching exercises to limber up, and strengthening exercises to bulk up your muscles and prevent future injury. Check out webmd.com for a good list of ankle exercises for sprained ankles.

    1. Rest

    Resting is one of the most important things you can do for your ankle. If you try to maintain your normal level of activity after a sprain, you could make the damage worse or re-injure yourself. You should avoid walking or standing on your ankle as much as possible. When you can put your feet up, don’t forget to elevate!


    This post was posted in Education

  • Four Common Causes of Back Pain (and How to Prevent Them)

    Posted on February 16, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    painBack pain is a common reason for doctor visits and one of the biggest causes of disability worldwide. But many of the top causes of back pain are avoidable. Knowing the common causes of back pain (and how to prevent them) can keep your back healthy and pain-free.

    Here are four top causes of back pain, and how to prevent them.

    1. Weekend Injuries

    If you lead a sedentary lifestyle most of the time, it’s easy to injure yourself playing with your kids or at a pickup basketball game on the weekend. You can also injure your back doing yard work, cleaning out the garage, or with any other activity you don’t often perform - especially if you’re usually idle.

    To prevent back injury, you should make your body accustomed to exercise (the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week). You can also stretch and strengthen your core using back strengthening exercises, which condition your muscles to support your spine and withstand stress. Regular exercise will help your body better resist injury.

    1. Improper Lifting Technique

    Whether you’re taking out the trash or hauling boxes around at work, improper lifting technique can cause injury and back pain. Using your back to carry a heavy load puts too much stress on your muscles and spine.

    Lift heavy objects close to your body, bending your knees and setting your legs apart. Make sure to engage your abdominal and leg muscles as you lift. When you’re walking and carrying, turn your entire body when you need to change direction. Twisting to the side can cause injury.

    1. Excessive Sitting

    The negative effects of a sedentary lifestyle are well documented and common in the age of the office job. Sitting too much puts stress on the muscles and discs in your back and neck. It also can lead to hip flexor tightness and reduced blood flow to your glutes, which help support your spine.

    You should get up from the couch or office chair on a regular basis to get some exercise. This will help your back and combat the other negative effects of prolonged sitting. You can up a periodic reminder to get up and exercise.

    1. Bad Posture 

    Good posture promotes spinal stability and strength. But when you slouch or stoop, you could be setting yourself up for back pain.

    You should be standing straight and tall, with your shoulders back. Your feet should be set about shoulder width apart, with your weight balanced on the balls of your feet. When sitting down, you should be sitting up straight with your feet resting flat on the floor in front of you. The top of your head should be pointed toward the ceiling, with your shoulders relaxed.

     

    Sources:
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/multimedia/back-pain/sls-20076817
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/expert-answers/exercise/faq-20057916
    https://www.spine-health.com/wellness/exercise/back-strengthening-exercises
    https://www.spineuniverse.com/wellness/ergonomics/sitting-disease-its-impact-your-spine


    This post was posted in Education

  • Six Tips for Choosing a Travel Pillow

    Posted on February 7, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    travelTravel pillows are an important accessory for any trip, but they’re frequently overlooked. Too often, you may find yourself frantically digging through your closet or stopping at the airport convenience shop when you realize you need one.

    But choosing the wrong pillow can lead to poor sleep, neck pain, or back pain. Picking the right travel pillow requires some thought and consideration.

    Here are six tips for choosing the right travel pillow.

    1. Define Your Needs

    If you want a pillow to use as you sleep on the plane, train, or in the car, a neck pillow is probably the right choice. But if you need a pillow for bed (hotels in particular have notoriously flat, unsupportive pillows) you’ll want a portable pillow that recreates how you sleep at home. The right pillow for you depends on your specific needs.

    1. Use a Trusted Brand

    Ideally, the pillow you use in your bed at home is comfortable and provides proper support to your head and neck. If you already have a brand of pillow you’re very happy with, you should check out that brand’s travel pillow products. There’s no guarantee you’ll love their travel pillow as much as their normal pillow, but at least you’ll be working with a brand that has a proven track record.

    1. Choose a Pillow You Can Wash

    Traveling can be rough on your things. Choose a pillow with simple, easy washing instructions so you can give it a good cleaning when you get back from your trip.

    1. Choose the Right Material

    Pillows come in all types of materials, but the most common options are foam and fiber. Foam pillows are firm and contour to the shape of your body, adjusting as you move during sleep. On the downside, foam pillows tend to retain heat and can get hot as you sleep.

    Fiber pillows emulate down pillows, are often quite comfortable, and sleep cooler than foam pillows. However, they don’t contour to your body as well as foam.

    Pay attention to the pillow’s material and pick the option that’s right for you.

    1. Do Your Research 

    Know any frequent travelers? Get their opinions on the best pillows to buy. The Internet is also full of reviews for most pillow brands. If you’re really stuck, try some pillows out in the store.

    1. Check the Return Policy

    It’s hard to gauge the quality and effectiveness of a pillow online or in the store. Make sure to pick a pillow with a solid return policy, as you’ll likely need some road testing to determine if it’s the right pillow for you. If you decide it’s not the best fit, you’ll be able to return it without any hassle.


    This post was posted in Education

  • Eight Tips for Fighting Winter Illness

    Posted on January 30, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    sickDuring the winter months, you’re much more vulnerable to catching a cold or the flu. There are a few reasons people are more vulnerable to these illnesses when it’s cold out; possible causes include more time spent indoors in close proximity others and a seasonally weakened immune system. But no matter the cause, there are things you can do to naturally boost your immune system or avoid viruses.

    Here are eight tips for fighting winter illness.

    1. Get Your Flu Vaccine

    Ideally, you should get your flu vaccine by the end of October, before the flu really starts to spread. But if you haven’t been vaccinated this season, you can still benefit from a vaccine in January or later. It may take up to two weeks for antibodies to develop as a response, so get your flu shot as soon as you can.

    1. Get Your Vitamin D

    Vitamin D helps regulate your blood pressure, reduces the risk of diabetes and arthritis, and bolsters your immune system. But during the colder months, people tend to stay inside, and lose out on the primary supplier of Vitamin D - directly exposing the skin to sunlight. A Vitamin D deficiency may develop, but you can keep your levels up by taking an over the counter Vitamin D supplement.

    1. Get Your Rest

    Not getting enough sleep is linked to a long list of physical and mental issues, including a weakened immune system. Even mild sleep deprivation leaves you more vulnerable to viruses and respiratory illnesses. Getting at least seven hours of sleep will leave you more prepared to resist illness.

    1. Eat a Balanced Diet

    A balanced diet that includes protein, vegetables, fruits, and omega-3 fatty acids can help keep your immune system running smoothly. A diet that’s with too many much sugar, fat, or empty calories can leave your immune system depleted. Make sure you’re eating a balanced diet.

    1. Exercise

    Regular exercise can help you feel great and increase your immunity to certain illnesses. Of course, exercise also bestows a huge variety of other physical and psychological benefits.

    A moderate, consistent exercise routine is the best bet for most people. Avoid overdoing it, as you could injure yourself or even increase your risk of illness.

    1. Wash Your Hands

    One of the most common vehicles for spreading germs are everyday objects in common spaces – doorknobs, computer keyboards, elevator buttons, and more. If you touch something that’s covered in germs, and then touch your mouth or nose, you can get infected. The best way to avoid germs is to wash your hands regular and thoroughly, with soap, for at least 20 seconds at a time.

    1. Reduce Stress

    Chronic stress can take a psychological and physical toll, and even suppress the cells you use to fight off infection. If you live under constant stress, you’re putting your health at risk. Try to take steps to remove some stress from your life.

    1. Stop Smoking and Drinking

    There is evidence that smoking and drinking weakens your immune system, making you more likely to get sick. If you drink or smoke, you should try to give up these habits – at least for the winter months. Of course, it’s advisable to give up smoking altogether and only drink in moderation.

     

    Sources:
    https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm
    https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm
    https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/vitamin-d-vital-role-in-your-health#1
    https://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/immune-system-lack-of-sleep#1


    This post was posted in Education

  • Seven Ways to Get Exercise When It’s Cold Out

    Posted on January 26, 2018 by Core Products

    By Brian Acton

    swimmingIf the great outdoors is your favorite venue for getting exercise, cold winter weather can put a real damper on your workout routine. Cold temperatures can make it unpleasant to exercise outside; throw in snow, ice, or freezing rain, and an outdoor workout could be dangerous.

    Nevertheless, you need to get regular exercise to stay healthy. Luckily, you don’t have to go into hibernation all winter. Instead, you can move your workout indoors.

    Here are seven ways to get exercise indoors when the weather gets cold.

    1. Join a Gym

    Gyms aren’t for everyone. But they stock a wide range of exercise equipment, have perks such as showers and fitness classes, and even offer a way to get out and make friends.

    If you only need a place to work out until the spring, you could sign up for a month-to-month membership and cancel once the weather warms up.

    1. Join an Indoor Pool

    If you have a local indoor community pool, now is the perfect time to become a member. Indoor pools can provide blessed relief when you’re craving a dip in the middle of winter. Plus, swimming is a low-impact cardio exercise that is easy on your joints and muscles.

    1. Fire Up an At-Home Workout

    There are plenty of home workout DVDs and programs that range in intensity, goals, and price. Whether you’re looking to boost your heart rate or shred your abs, there’s an at-home workout product for you. Even YouTube is full of free workout tutorials and videos. All you need is a screen, some content, and the willingness to hit “Play.”

    Of course, do your research before you buy a workout program. They aren’t all created equal.

    1. Indoor Classes and Recreation

    There are plenty of indoor workout classes you can take to shake off the winter blues. Cycling, kickboxing, and boot camp classes are a few of the popular ways to get an indoor workout in a community setting.

    Other creative indoor ways to break a sweat include racquetball, indoor rock climbing courses, and even laser tag.

    1. Get an Exercise Machine

    If you don’t mind the expense, an indoor exercise machine could be a good permanent addition to your home. Rowing machines, treadmills, and stationary bikes allow you to get a great workout without leaving the house.

    If you want a full workout experience, check out our guide on building a home gym.

    1. Create Your Own Routine

    Even if you don’t want to buy exercise equipment, you can create your own workout routine at home. Lunges, planks, pushups, and squats can make up an intense workout routine that requires no extra equipment. You can even use stairs to recreate the Stairmaster experience.

    1. Clean

    If you want to multitask, cleaning is a good way to get moving. Cleaning activities can range from light exercise like sweeping to hard labor like reorganizing a cluttered garage. You’ll be simultaneously burning calories and improving your home.


    This post was posted in Education

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